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A crisis can be a valuable experience, if we learn from it. Most Texans are aware that we have been experiencing a chronic crisis for the past five years: a historic drought that has attracted national attention and radically reshaped how we think about water.

We have the opportunity now to learn from this current crisis. A 2014 study commissioned by the Texas Water Foundation finds that only 28 percent of Texans know where their water comes from; that’s the same percentage as in...

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A crisis can be a valuable experience, if we learn from it. Most Texans are aware that we have been experiencing a chronic crisis for the past five years: a historic drought that has attracted national attention and radically reshaped how we think about water.

We have the opportunity now to learn from this current crisis. A 2014 study commissioned by the Texas Water Foundation finds that only 28 percent of Texans know where their water comes from; that’s the same percentage as in 2004, the last time the study was carried out. Faith communities can play an active role in educating Texans about water stewardship.

The good news is, our state has taken to heart lessons learned from past crises. The previous drought of record, which occurred between 1945 and 1955, was the catalyst for the foundation of the Texas Water Development Board. The drought of the 1950s, which nearly crippled the state’s agricultural industry, demonstrated to Texans that we needed to plan for our water resources on a statewide level in order to be better prepared for future drought.

In 1997, the Texas legislature dramatically reorganized the way our state plans for the future of our water. Senate Bill 1, enacted by the 75th Texas legislature, established sixteen water planning regions to allow for a more regionally-focused and responsive approach to water planning. These regions correspond roughly to major river basins in the state, and the planning groups are made up of industry, municipal, and conservation leaders.

What these planning groups need—and invite, as planning group meetings are open to public comment—is the input of the people they serve. For our state’s water planning process to be successful, we all need to be informed and engaged participants. This can take many forms, from serving on a regional planning group to simply learning where your tap water comes from.

People are much more likely to want to conserve a body of water when it’s one that they know. If we can educate ourselves and others about our water—where it comes from, where it goes, and how we can help protect it—then we are that much more likely to become active participants in the stewardship of our state’s natural resources, and help preserve it for generations to come.

 

Event Date: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2016 - 5:00pm

Sadia Tirmizi and Rev Sam Brannon were honored to visit the United Methodist Women of Lovers Lane UMC in Dallas, Texas on May 3rd. Sadia introduced Texas Impact and the Texas Interfaith Center for Public Policy, thanking the congregation for their long-standing membership and encouraged attendees to consider partnering with Texas Impact. The work we do at Texas Impact is never done alone. Only through partnering with our members can we successfully ensure that our state leaders are hearing the collective voice of people of faith in shaping public policy.

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LearnEngageWater Captains

When it comes to water, Texas has a grassroots approach to planning for our state’s water future. Each of Texas’ 16 regional water regions has a citizen planning group that sets priorities for water projects in that region. Public input and participation in this process is crucial to ensuring a safe, abundant, and just water future for our state—which is why we’re hoping you’ll dive into your local water with us!

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EngageWater Captains
Event Date: 
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 10:30am

On Wednesday, April 27, 2016, Rev. Peggy Ogden-Howe and Sue Sidney, a United Methodist Women’s leader, accompanied Outreach & Engagement Specialist, Rev. Sam Brannon, to the Region G water-planning meeting in Waco, Texas. This Water Captains “field trip” was an opportunity for members of the faith community to participate in the regional water planning process.

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EngageWater Captains
Event Date: 
Wednesday, July 13, 2016 - 9:30am

Rev. Sam Brannon is joining Water Captains in Weslaco, Texas on July 13 to attend the regional water planning meeting.

When: July 13, 2016 at 9:30AM

Where: LRGVDC Transportation Center 510 S. Pleasantview Drive Weslaco, Texas..

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EngageWater Captains
Event Date: 
Wednesday, May 18, 2016 - 10:00am

Rev. Sam Brannon is joining Water Captains in Nacogdoches, Texas on May 18 to attend the regional water planning meeting.

When: May 18, 2016 at 10:00AM

Where: Nacogdoches Recreational Center, 1112 North Street, Nacogdoches, Texas.

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EngageWater Captains
Event Date: 
Wednesday, April 27, 2016 - 1:30pm

Rev. Sam Brannon is joining Water Captains in Waco, Texas on April 27 to attend the regional water planning meeting.

When: April 27, 2016 at 1:30PM

Where: Brazos River Authority Headquarters, 4600 Cobbs Drive, Waco, Texas.

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EngageWater Captains
Event Date: 
Sunday, April 24, 2016 -
9:30am to 2:00pm

Rev. Sam Brannon will speak during the "Sunday School" hour at Austin Heights Baptist Church in Nacogdoches, Texas, on April 24, 2016. After Rev. Brannon's presentation, Austin Heights Baptist Church will host a service outdoors followed by dinner on the grounds.

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LearnEngageWater Captains
Event Date: 
Saturday, March 19, 2016 -
9:00am to 12:00pm

Rev. Sam Brannon will be the keynote speaker at Living Water, a water stewadship event sponsored by the United Methodist Women of the North Central District of the North Texas Conference. The event will be held at Wylie UMC, 1401 FM 1378, Wylie, TX. Registration will start at 9 a.m.; event will conclude at noon.

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Engage

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