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Human Services

Basics

For Texas Impact, Human Services includes aging, adoption and foster care, domestic violence, housing, and workforce. In Texas there are five state agencies compose the health and human services system. These agencies are:

Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) has oversight responsibilities for Health and Human Services, and administers certain health and human services programs including the Texas Medicaid Program, Children’s Health Insurance Program (...

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For Texas Impact, Human Services includes aging, adoption and foster care, domestic violence, housing, and workforce. In Texas there are five state agencies compose the health and human services system. These agencies are:

Texas Health and Human Services Commission (HHSC) has oversight responsibilities for Health and Human Services, and administers certain health and human services programs including the Texas Medicaid Program, Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and Medicaid waste, fraud, and abuse investigations. To learn more about HHSC's programs, click here.

The Texas Department of Aging and Disability Services (DADS) provides programs and services that help children and adults with disabilities, children and adults with mental retardation, and older adults. DADS is made up of the mental retardation services and state school programs of the Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation, the community care, nursing facility, and long-term care regulatory services of the Department of Human Services, and aging services and programs of the Department on Aging. To learn more about DADS's programs, click here.

The Department of Assistive and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) provides services to Texans who are disabled and to families with children who have developmental delays. DARS is made up of all the programs from the Texas Rehabilitation Commission (TRC), the Texas Commission for the Blind (TCB), the Texas Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (TDHCC), and the Interagency Council on Early Childhood Intervention (ECI). To learn more about DARS's programs, click here.

The Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) was previously called the Texas Department of Protective and Regulatory Services. The Department is still charged with protecting children, adults who are elderly or have disabilities living at home or in state facilities, and licensing group day-care homes, day-care centers, and registered family houses. The agency also manages community-based programs that prevent delinquency, abuse, neglect and exploitation of Texas children, elderly and disabled adults. To learn more about DFPS's programs, click here.

Department of State Health Services (DSHS) brings together the Texas Commission on Alcohol and Drug Abuse, the Texas Department of Health, the mental health services of the Texas Department of Mental Health and Mental Retardation and the Texas Health Care Information Council. To learn more about DSHS's programs, click here.


Photo "RHS Wisley - Oct 2011 - Caring Candid - Sharing a Joke" by Flickr User Gareth Williams licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license.

This week was a big week for child welfare legislation, and the Senate Business & Commerce Committee also heard three important government transparency bills.

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Advocate

This week both chambers have been moving child welfare legislation to reform what a federal judge described as Texas’s “Dickensian” foster care and child protective services system.

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Advocate

On Thursday, February 2, 2017, the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services heard an update from the Department of Family and Protective Services on efforts to reform the child welfare system. After an update from Commissioner Hank Whitman, the committee considered SB 11, a large omnibus bill which would overhaul the state’s foster care and child protective services.

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Advocate

On Wednesday, October 26, 2016, the Senate Finance Committee met to discuss the funding needs proposed by the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) to ensure timely contact with children at immediate risk of abuse or neglect, and other proposals to improve child safety.

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In her 260 page decision declaring that Texas violated the constitutional right of foster children to be free from “an unreasonable risk of harm,” U.S. District Court Judge Janis Graham Jack quoted another Texas judge to describe what happens to the children that stay in Texas’s care for more than 18 months: “these are the children even God has forgotten.” Since Judge Jack’s December 17, 2015 decision, the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) has been under intense scrutiny.

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