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Civic Engagement

Basics

Civic engagement can take on many forms-- in the public policy sphere, there are a number of ways that people can and should use their voices to represent social concerns of communities and advocate for just policies. Below are a couple of ways that people can become civically involved.

Voting is a fundamental part of the democratic process. However, Texas lags behind most of the nation...

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Civic engagement can take on many forms-- in the public policy sphere, there are a number of ways that people can and should use their voices to represent social concerns of communities and advocate for just policies. Below are a couple of ways that people can become civically involved.

Voting is a fundamental part of the democratic process. However, Texas lags behind most of the nation when it comes to voter participation. According to the Texas Secretary of State, of the more than 14 million registered voters in the state, less than five million cast a ballot in the most recent statewide election. Low voter turnout is a problem in a democracy because it means that a small group of people is making election decisions for everyone. The  government affects nearly every aspect of our lives, so being personally motivated to vote and encouraging people in your community to do so is essential.

Knowing who your representatives are and visiting them is also vital to effective engagement in the democratic process. Doing this creates wider avenues for individuals and communities to affect change and strengthen the bonds between citizens and government. Whether you are visiting in broad terms about a policy issue or advocating a more specific position on a bill or an idea, developing relationships with elected officials is key in building a culture of civic responsibility in our local communities.

Participating in democracy is one important way that we love our neighbors. Through civic engagement, we can protect the most vulnerable, be stewards of human and natural resources, address economic and racial injustice, and promote diversity and peace.

Event Date: 
Friday, February 12, 2016 - 12:00pm

Today, Texas Impact Associate Policy Analyst Imaad Khan addressed congregants of the Nueces Mosque in downtown Austin during Jum’ah prayer services, which take place each Friday. Khan, a second-year graduate student in the LBJ School of Public Affairs at UT Austin, gave a khutbah, or sermon, that situated the call to civic engagement in the theological framework of Islam.

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Bee's presentation Faith in Democracy is available for you to use in your Sunday school class or group meeting. If you'd prefer to have Texas Impact staff come give a presentation, let us know!

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EngageFaith in Democracy
Event Date: 
Sunday, January 24, 2016 - 3:00pm to Tuesday, January 26, 2016 - 2:00pm

Click here to REGISTER TODAY!


UNITED METHODIST WOMEN IN TEXAS
28th Annual LEGISLATIVE EVENT
Program planned and produced by Texas Impact
 
The Way Texas Works
Join Women from All Around the State

To Engage Issues That Matter
 
JANUARY 24-26, 2016
Austin, Texas 
 
REGISTRATION IS UNLIMITED! Click here to register today!

To get the early-bird registration price, register by January 8, 2016.

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Advocate

There are three synods of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) in Texas.  At their annual legislative conference, members from all of Texas’ ELCA synods adopted a consensus legislative agenda reflecting their priority legislative concerns. 

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AdvocateLegislative Agenda

Get Started: Take the Active Citizenship Quiz

Want to find out how active your citizenship really is? Here’s a quick quiz to help you assess your current skills and participation level, with suggestions for how to move forward no matter where you are today.

Citizenship Quiz

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Advocate
Event Date: 
Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 4:15pm

Leave it to the lawyer to start a blog post with a legal disclaimer.  As General Counsel to the Texas Interfaith Center for Public Policy, a 501(c)(3), this blog post is about voting rights.  Period.  We do not care about political parties.  We do not care about this issue because we secretly think it helps one party.  There are no lines in which to read between.

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